Vintage Sewing and Dressmaking Advice | Great Blog Round-Up

Vintage Sewing and Dressmaking Advice | Great Blog Round-Up

Hi there, yesterday I came across some really good blogs that I want to share, you may already know about some or all of these sites but you may not.

Most are about vintage sewing, dressmaking and various techniques. I hope that you’ll find them useful.

A Good Wardrobe – her blog offers advice about what makes a good wardrobe and how to make it. I was going to pass on this one, but I decided to check out the content and it’s really good and personable site and I think one the deserves bookmarking. The post that got my attention was “Independent Pattern Designers“, her page provides great links to pattern designer websites.

Megan Nielsen – was another blog that I found interesting, I like the idea of sew-a-longs and at some point plan on conducting my own. In the meanwhile the site has tutorials and a lot of little quickie DIY projects, it’s a good resource.

Kestrel Makes – a lively site, what caught my attention was that she features vintage knitting patterns as well as sewing projects, what caught my eye was this 60’s vintage V neck pullover pattern.

Julia Bobbin - 1960's dress with Butterick 5747

Julia Bobbin, I think this blog is my favorite find of the week, the blog was really informative even for an experienced seamstress and crocheter such as myself, especially the post on Bound Buttonholes, I have to say it is really good and will become a permanent link on our tutorial page.

Sewing Your Style is another favorite of mine, the primary reason is she’s bustie and has hips which mean every pattern requires alterations or style changes. How to do them can be tricky, hurrah for us not really plus size bustie and hippy women with their own sense of style. Remember this; you can wear most any style providing you can make the necessary alterations and style changes to account for your full figure.

The next site has nothing at all to do with sewing, but is does have to do with good foundations for us who can’t buy our foundation garments at big box stores such as Target, Kmart or Walmart. last year my daughter and I went for out annual bra fitting and my measurement was a 36F, you can’t find that size at most stores, so two really good bras cost about $140…ouch! Well Facebooks targeted ads were right on the money with this bra website called Brayola. At first I wasn’t all that keen about going through the process, but I did and found my Panache Andorra bras for 50% less than what I paid at the store in Royal Oak, Michigan, so check it out. Yes, the personal fitting was worth it, but not at that price.

Lucky Lucille – is another site that I found absolutely delightful to browse around. Rochelle focus is mainly 40’s patterns, but she also has a vintage knitting page, over the years I have tried many times to just finish a knitted scarf, I’ve given up on learning how to knit except by machine. However, I love knits, and I’ve come to this conclusion — crochet is my thing. The other phenomenal find is that she does vintage fabric reproductions worth checking out for sure.

By Hand London – is another site we liked a lot, the primary reason is because it’s full of resources. Try out the Tracing and Altering Patterns or the Victoria Blazer Sew a-Long. Finally,the Zippers Hems and Finishing Touches, they were all well laid-out and very useful.

I leave for Detroit for a few days, I’ll be visiting Haberman’s Fabrics in Royal Oak, the only really true fabric store remaining in southeastern Michigan. Living here in northern NY in the woods, I might add, New York City is just as far as Detroit from where I live and cost me less once I’m there. My other fabric option which is truly a gem is the Fabric District in Montreal which is closer than both of my other choices. One of these days I’ll tell about my truly inspiration trip to the Fabric District in downtown Los Angeles — I was truly overwhelmed and came away with just some velvet–go figure.

I came back to add a link that started by link chase yesterday and Gertie answered the burning question once again that I find from anyone who wants to sew vintage patterns realizes very quickly, the raraity of large size patterns and even when you do find the right bust and hip size additional grading and alterations are still needed. Vintage pattern sizing is a quest that you can never have too many sources for guidance.

Stay tuned for the next installment of the Spadea’s Collection of Designer Sewing Tips

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